Protecting resources behind an authenticating proxy

Today, we’re putting our core web services behind the protections provided by U2F and Google’s account takeover and anomaly detection systems. Not only will this provide phishing resistance through the authentication proxy, but also authorization through IAM roles assigned to the user’s Google account.

Prerequisites:

  • Google account
  • U2F Yubikey enrolled and enforced for the users/groups that will be accessing the application.
  • An hour or so.
  • A global cloud that has been operating at billions of rps for decades. (Beyond the scope of this article.)

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Titan: a custom TPM and more

I listened to a podcast and cut out the chit-chat, so you don’t have to:

Titan is a tiny security co-processing chip used for encryption, authentication of hardware, authentication of services.

Purpose

Every piece of hardware in google’s infrastructure can be individually identified and cryptographically verified, and any service using it mutually authenticates to that hardware. This includes servers, networking cards, switches: everything. The Titan chip is one of the ways to accomplish that.

The chip certifies that hardware is in a trusted good state. If this verification fails, the hardware will not boot, and will be replaced.

Every time a new bios is pushed, Titan checks that the code is authentic Google code before allowing it to be installed.  It then checks each time that code is booted that it is authentic, before allowing boot to continue.

‘similar in theory to the u2f security keys, everything should have identity, hardware and software. Everything’s identity is checked all the time.’

Suggestions that it plays important role in hardware level data encryption, key management systems, etc.

Hardware

Each chip is fused with a unique identifier. Done sequentially, so can verify it’s part of inventory sequence.

Three main functions: RNG, crypto engine, and monotonic counter. First two are self-explanatory. Monotonic counter to protect against replay attacks, and make logs tamper evident.

Sits between ROM and RAM, to provide signature valididation of the first 8KB of BIOS on installation and boot up.

Production

Produced entirely within google. Design and process to ensure provenance. Have used other vendor’s security coprocessors in the past, but want to ensure they understand/know the whole truth.

Google folks unaware of any other cloud that uses TPMs, etc to verify every piece of hardware and software running on it.

Biometric Person Authentication IS A Multiple Classifier Problem

Several papers have already shown the interest of using multiple classifiers in order to enhance the performance of biometric person authentication systems. In this paper, we would like to argue that the core task of Biometric Person Authentication is actually a multiple classifier problem as such: indeed, in order to reach state-of-the-art performance, we argue that all current systems , in one way or another, try to solve several tasks simultaneously and that without such joint training (or sharing), they would not succeed as well. We explain hereafter this perspective, and according to it, we propose some ways to take advantage of it, ranging from more parameter sharing to similarity learning.

Source: https://static.googleusercontent.com/media/research.google.com/en//pubs/archive/32829.pdf

Neither Snow Nor Rain Nor MITM . . . An Empirical Analysis of Email Delivery Security

The SMTP protocol is responsible for carrying some of users most intimate communication, but like other Internet protocols, authentication and confidentiality were added only as an afterthought. In this work, we present the first report on global adoption rates of SMTP security extensions, including: STARTTLS, SPF, DKIM, and DMARC. We present data from two perspectives: SMTP server configurations for the Alexa Top Million domains, and over a year of SMTP connections to and from Gmail. We find that the top mail providers (e.g., Gmail, Yahoo, and Outlook) all proactively encrypt and authenticate messages. However, these best practices have yet to reach widespread adoption in a long tail of over 700,000 SMTP servers, of which only 35% successfully configure encryption, and 1.1% specify a DMARC authentication policy. This security patchwork — paired with SMTP policies that favor failing open to allow gradual deployment — exposes users to attackers who downgrade TLS connections in favor of cleartext and who falsify MX records to reroute messages. We present evidence of such attacks in the wild, highlighting seven countries where more than 20% of inbound Gmail messages arrive in cleartext due to network attackers.

Source: https://static.googleusercontent.com/media/research.google.com/en//pubs/archive/43962.pdf

Picasso: Lightweight Device Class Fingerprinting for Web Clients

In this work we present Picasso: a lightweight device class fingerprinting protocol that allows a server to verify the software and hardware stack of a mobile or desktop client. As an example, Picasso can distinguish between traffic sent by an authentic iPhone running Safari on iOS from an emulator or desktop client spoofing the same configuration. Our fingerprinting scheme builds on unpredictable yet stable noise introduced by a client’s browser, operating system, and graphical stack when rendering HTML5 canvases. Our algorithm is resistant to replay and includes a hardware-bound proof of work that forces a client to expend a configurable amount of CPU and memory to solve challenges. We demonstrate that Picasso can distinguish 52 million Android, iOS, Windows, and OSX clients running a diversity of browsers with 100% accuracy. We discuss applications of Picasso in abuse fighting, including protecting the Play Store or other mobile app marketplaces from inorganic interactions; or identifying login attempts to user accounts from previously unseen device classes.

Source: https://static.googleusercontent.com/media/research.google.com/en//pubs/archive/45581.pdf

CONIKS: Bringing Key Transparency to End Users

We present CONIKS, an end-user key verification service capable of integration in end-to-end encrypted communication systems. CONIKS builds on transparency log proposals for web server certificates but solves several new challenges specific to key verification for end users. CONIKS obviates the need for global third-party monitors and enables users to efficiently monitor their own key bindings for consistency, downloading less than 20 kB per day to do so even for a provider with billions of users. CONIKS users and providers can collectively audit providers for non-equivocation, and this requires downloading a constant 2.5 kB per provider per day. Additionally, CONIKS preserves the level of privacy offered by today’s major communication services, hiding the list of usernames present and even allowing providers to conceal the total number of users in the system.

Source: https://eprint.iacr.org/2014/1004.pdf