Sincronia: Near-Optimal Network Design for Coflows

We present Sincronia, a near-optimal network design for coflows that can be implemented on top on any transport layer (for flows) that supports priority scheduling. Sincronia achieves this using a key technical result — we show that given a “right” ordering of coflows, any per-flow rate allocation mechanism achieves average coflow completion time within 4X of the optimal as long as (co)flows are prioritized with respect to the ordering.

Sincronia uses a simple greedy mechanism to periodically order all unfinished coflows; each host sets priorities for its flows using corresponding coflow order and offloads the flow scheduling and rate allocation to the underlying priority-enabled transport layer. We evaluate Sincronia over a real testbed comprising 16-servers and commodity switches, and using simulations across a variety of workloads. Evaluation results suggest that Sincronia not only admits a practical, near-optimal design but also improves upon state-of-the-art network designs for coflows (sometimes by as much as 8X).

Source: http://delivery.acm.org/10.1145/3240000/3230569/p16-agarwal.pdf?ip=108.51.128.31&id=3230569&acc=OPEN&key=4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E6D218144511F3437&__acm__=1533991235_320a71237c29327489e1ed7bb1e12a6a

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B4 and After: Managing Hierarchy, Partitioning, and Asymmetry for Availability and Scale in Google’s Software-Defined WAN

Private WANs are increasingly important to the operation of
enterprises, telecoms, and cloud providers. For example, B4,
Google’s private software-defined WAN, is larger and growing
faster than our connectivity to the public Internet. In this
paper, we present the five-year evolution of B4. We describe
the techniques we employed to incrementally move from
offering best-effort content-copy services to carrier-grade
availability, while concurrently scaling B4 to accommodate
100x more traffic. Our key challenge is balancing the tension
introduced by hierarchy required for scalability, the partitioning
required for availability, and the capacity asymmetry
inherent to the construction and operation of any large-scale
network. We discuss our approach to managing this tension:
i) we design a custom hierarchical network topology for both
horizontal and vertical software scaling, ii) we manage inherent
capacity asymmetry in hierarchical topologies using
a novel traffic engineering algorithm without packet encapsulation,
and iii) we re-architect switch forwarding rules
via two-stage matching/hashing to deal with asymmetric
network failures at scale.

Source: http://delivery.acm.org/10.1145/3240000/3230545/p74-hong.pdf?ip=108.51.128.31&id=3230545&acc=OPEN&key=4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E6D218144511F3437&__acm__=1533991178_bf46d05c3ddf7924ca5de25921085a50

Andromeda: Performance, Isolation, and Velocity at Scale in Cloud Network Virtualization

This paper presents our design and experience with Andromeda,
Google Cloud Platform’s network virtualization
stack. Our production deployment poses several challenging
requirements, including performance isolation among
customer virtual networks, scalability, rapid provisioning
of large numbers of virtual hosts, bandwidth and latency
largely indistinguishable from the underlying hardware,
and high feature velocity combined with high availability.
Andromeda is designed around a flexible hierarchy of
flow processing paths. Flows are mapped to a programming
path dynamically based on feature and performance
requirements. We introduce the Hoverboard programming
model, which uses gateways for the long tail of low bandwidth
flows, and enables the control plane to program
network connectivity for tens of thousands of VMs in
seconds. The on-host dataplane is based around a highperformance
OS bypass software packet processing path.
CPU-intensive per packet operations with higher latency
targets are executed on coprocessor threads. This architecture
allows Andromeda to decouple feature growth from
fast path performance, as many features can be implemented
solely on the coprocessor path. We demonstrate
that the Andromeda datapath achieves performance that is
competitive with hardware while maintaining the flexibility
and velocity of a software-based architecture.

Source: https://www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/nsdi18/nsdi18-dalton.pdf

Taking the Edge off with Espresso: Scale, Reliability and Programmability for Global Internet Peering

We present the design of Espresso, Google’s SDN-based Internet
peering edge routing infrastructure. This architecture grew out of a
need to exponentially scale the Internet edge cost-effectively and to
enable application-aware routing at Internet-peering scale. Espresso
utilizes commodity switches and host-based routing/packet process-
ing to implement a novel fine-grained traffic engineering capability.
Overall, Espresso provides Google a scalable peering edge that is
programmable, reliable, and integrated with global traffic systems.
Espresso also greatly accelerated deployment of new networking
features at our peering edge. Espresso has been in production for
two years and serves over 22% of Google’s total traffic to the Inter-
net.

Source: http://delivery.acm.org/10.1145/3100000/3098854/p432-Yap.pdf?ip=71.127.43.118&id=3098854&acc=OA&key=4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E5945DC2EABF3343C&CFID=822652791&CFTOKEN=84906944&__acm__=1508966541_3307496633bb16bac9c9b6dbf3cd6d11

Espresso makes Google cloud faster, more available and cost effective by extending SDN to the public internet

Today, we gave a keynote presentation at the Open Networking Summit, where we shared details about Espresso, Google’s peering edge architecture—the latest offering in our Software Defined Networking (SDN) strategy. Espresso has been in production for over two years and routes 20 percent of our total traffic to the internet—and growing. It’s changing the way traffic is directed at the peering edge, delivering unprecedented scale, flexibility and efficiency.

Source: https://www.blog.google/topics/google-cloud/making-google-cloud-faster-more-available-and-cost-effective-extending-sdn-public-internet-espresso/

Cutting the Cord: a Robust Wireless Facilities Network for Data Centers

Today’s network control and management traffic are limited by
their reliance on existing data networks. Fate sharing in this context
is highly undesirable, since control traffic has very different availability
and traffic delivery requirements. In this paper, we explore
the feasibility of building a dedicated wireless facilities network for
data centers. We propose Angora, a low-latency facilities network
using low-cost, 60GHz beamforming radios that provides robust
paths decoupled from the wired network, and flexibility to adapt to
workloads and network dynamics. We describe our solutions to address
challenges in link coordination, link interference and network
failures. Our testbed measurements and simulation results show
that Angora enables large number of low-latency control paths to
run concurrently, while providing low latency end-to-end message
delivery with high tolerance for radio and rack failures.

Source: https://static.googleusercontent.com/media/research.google.com/en//pubs/archive/43860.pdf