Blocking-resistant communication through domain fronting

Abstract: We describe “domain fronting,” a versatile
censorship circumvention technique that hides the remote
endpoint of a communication. Domain fronting
works at the application layer, using HTTPS, to communicate
with a forbidden host while appearing to communicate
with some other host, permitted by the censor.
The key idea is the use of different domain names at
different layers of communication. One domain appears
on the “outside” of an HTTPS request—in the DNS request
and TLS Server Name Indication—while another
domain appears on the “inside”—in the HTTP Host
header, invisible to the censor under HTTPS encryption.
A censor, unable to distinguish fronted and nonfronted
traffic to a domain, must choose between allowing
circumvention traffic and blocking the domain entirely,
which results in expensive collateral damage. Domain
fronting is easy to deploy and use and does not require
special cooperation by network intermediaries. We
identify a number of hard-to-block web services, such as
content delivery networks, that support domain-fronted
connections and are useful for censorship circumvention.
Domain fronting, in various forms, is now a circumvention
workhorse. We describe several months of deployment
experience in the Tor, Lantern, and Psiphon circumvention
systems, whose domain-fronting transports
now connect thousands of users daily and transfer many
terabytes per month.

Source: https://www.bamsoftware.com/papers/fronting.pdf

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Distributed forensics and incident response in the enterprise

Remote live forensics has recently been increasingly used in order to facilitate rapid remote access to enterprise machines. We present the GRR Rapid Response Framework (GRR), a new multi-platform, open source tool for enterprise forensic investigations enabling remote raw disk and memory access. GRR is designed to be scalable, opening the door for continuous enterprise wide forensic analysis. This paper describes the architecture used by GRR and illustrates how it is used routinely to expedite enterprise forensic investigations.

Source: https://research.google.com/pubs/archive/37237.pdf

Hunting in the Enterprise: Forensic Triage and Incident Response

In enterprise environments, digital forensic analysis generates data volumes that traditional forensic methods are no longer prepared to handle. Triaging has been proposed as a solution to systematically prioritize the acquisition and analysis of digital evidence. We explore the application of automated triaging processes in such settings, where reliability and customizability are crucial for a successful deployment. We specifically examine the use of GRR Rapid Response (GRR) – an advanced open source distributed enterprise forensics system – in the triaging stage of common incident response investigations. We show how this system can be leveraged for automated prioritization of evidence across the whole enterprise fleet and describe the implementation details required to obtain sufficient robustness for large scale enterprise deployment. We analyze the performance of the system by simulating several realistic incidents and discuss some of the limitations of distributed agent based systems for enterprise triaging.

Source: https://research.google.com/pubs/pub41215.html

Digital Forensics with Open Source Tools

Digital Forensics with Open Source Tools is the definitive book on investigating and analyzing computer systems and media using open source tools. The book is a technical procedural guide, and explains the use of these tools on Linux and Windows systems as a platform for performing computer forensics. Both well known and novel forensic methods are demonstrated using command-line and graphical open source computer forensic tools for examining a wide range of target systems and artifacts.

Source: https://research.google.com/pubs/pub41604.html

Distributed forensics and incident response in the enterprise

Remote live forensics has recently been increasingly used in order to facilitate rapid remote access to enterprise machines. We present the GRR Rapid Response Framework (GRR), a new multi-platform, open source tool for enterprise forensic investigations enabling remote raw disk and memory access. GRR is designed to be scalable, opening the door for continuous enterprise wide forensic analysis. This paper describes the architecture used by GRR and illustrates how it is used routinely to expedite enterprise forensic investigations.

Source: https://research.google.com/pubs/pub37237.html